Coding Rock, Paper, Scissors to Teach Probability

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Coding Rock, Paper, Scissors to Teach Probability
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This application will randomly select Rock, Paper or Scissors for two players and determine the winner. Check out the source code and give it a try for yourself!

Project Page: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/102855970/




Source:

Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 10.29.29 AM

Demo:

 

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2 Responses for this post

  1. Aviva
    Aviva
    | |

    Brian, I always appreciate how you share the games that you make, and I can certainly see how this game would help with getting a larger sample size for Rock, Paper, Scissors. I’m thinking about probability though. We spend so much time in the primary grades playing probability games. Is there more to probability than games though? I remember having this conversation when I taught Grade 5, and looking at some more real world examples of probability. This definitely seemed to link more with critical thinking. What do you think? How do we balance the games and the other options? Do we provide enough of these other options? Thoughts?

    Aviva

    Reply
    1. Kelly
      Kelly
      | |

      Maybe intertwine language of probability wherever it fits in classroom conversations – impossible, likely, certain…, and connect to fractional language, number value lines, relate to ‘out of 10’, ‘on a scale of 1 – 10’, majority, and of course percents and decimals as appropriate. Setting up proportional reasoning within probability will prepare for that flexible thinking we hope they develop!

      Reply

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